Study Skills Were Not Forgotten

The primary study skills include:  positive work habits, setting goals, planning, managing time, memorization, reading strategies, taking notes, keeping track of homework and resources, and planning how and when to study.

At the core of study skills is note-taking.  Techniques that are defined for note-taking include outlining and summarizing.  Does this sound familiar?  Narrations, or summaries, begin in the grammar stage and continue throughout the logic and rhetoric stages.  Outlining begins in the logic stage and is continued through the rhetoric stage.  I can cross this one off of my list.

… positive work habits, setting goals, planning, managing time, memorization, reading strategies, taking notes, keeping track of homework and resources, and planning how and when to study.

Memorization, or memorizing facts, is another key skill.  I implemented a memory book for each of my girls the very first year of homeschooling.  They were taught gradually over time how to memorize by reviewing and repeating the lists.  Cross this one off too.

… positive work habits, setting goals, planning, managing time, memorization, reading strategies, taking notes, keeping track of homework and resources, and planning how and when to study.

Develop reading strategies is another skill, especially for college-bound students.  How do you deal with large volumes of information and multiple resources?  Oh wait.  They start doing that in the later grammar stage and continue through to high school.  We use multiple resources.  They are taught to consult indexes, encylopedias, digital media, etc. for topical information.  Draw a line through this one. It’s done already too.

… positive work habits, setting goals, planning, managing time, memorization, reading strategies, taking notes, keeping track of homework and resources, and planning how and when to study.

While I tend to lack some organization, I do encourage and teach my students to be responsible for their work and resources.  There are designated areas for resources to be returned too after the day’s use.  As well, we use file folders for each week for planning and management.  All work is returned to the file folder.  Portfolios keep completed work.  I can cross this one off!

… positive work habits, setting goals, planning, managing time, memorization, reading strategies, taking notes, keeping track of homework and resources, and planning how and when to study.

Where do I start to falter in teaching skills?

I tend to evaluate subjectively.  There is very little test taking.  Therefore, test-taking strategies have not been learned or taught.  In direct relationship to this, my student will never have set aside time to study or planned to study. To better adjust for this lack of skill, I will implement objective testing in the upcoming year’s plan.  As well, I will require a student journal.  In this journal, I will have my student document the day’s work and plan to study by marking on a calendar the test date and study times, including what will be studied during a particular session. I will keep this one on the list with setting goals, planning, and managing time.   I don’t feel that we have stressed these components enough in an academic environment.

… positive work habits, setting goals, planning, managing time, memorization, reading strategies, taking notes, keeping track of homework and resources, and planning how and when to study.

The last is positive work habits.  Yes, I must say that due dates are not fixed in this house.  We do tend to see the sun shinning and run out the door whithout a care as to whether or not homework is on time or class work completed.  I will neither cross this one off or make it a point to focus on it.  I will just pretend not to see it for a few more years!

I hope you enjoyed my evaluation of our own skill sets, and I hope that you find some value.

Here are some resources and links that I may implement over time:

 

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under General

Leave a Reply